A London editor is facing the wrath of Twitter after taking a subtle shot at a Black woman enjoying life on an estate in England.

Liv Siddall made her controversial comment on Twitter, announcing that she's deleting her Instagram account because she saw a picture of lifestyle blogger Paula Sutton relaxing on a picnic blanket in front of an estate.  


"Deleted Instagram today for the first time ever (eight years!)," Siddall wrote on Twitter. "Don't know when I'll be back, but let it be known that this was the image that did it."

It didn't take long for social media to catch the racist undertone in the post, with many people calling out the editor for being salty. 





Since she failed to realize the consequences before posting, it would only be so long before Siddall would be deemed a Karen. 

For some people, it was just too difficult to understand why anybody would hate from outside the estate... 

One person summed up Siddall's problem with Sutton's post quite precisely.

Siddall tried to apologize in another tweet.  


The controversial post also turned out to be a chance for some people to learn about Sutton. 

Sutton, who initially didn't understand why she'd gained an influx of followers (she was hoping Oprah might have shared one of her photos), responded to the situation in an Instagram post. 

"Well, it’s been the strangest 24 hours that I’ve ever experienced on social media," Sutton wrote. "It started with a Twitter rant using my picture as an example of what is wrong Instagram (the author has since contacted me privately and apologised) and ended with an incredible outpouring of love, support and kindness that I will be eternally grateful for."

She then went on to say that she utilizes Instagram as a forum of discussion about the things which bring her joy and as a way to process her mother's death. Sutton unapologetically added that her Instagram account is just a small glimpse into her world. 

"They are a tiny snapshot of an otherwise very mundane and normal life. Too shallow for you? Perhaps....but I’m a firm believer in taking the responsibility to find the content that brings YOU joy and moving on from the things that upset you," the writer added.

The mother of three then thanked her supporters and embraced a new nickname. 

"I just want to thank each and everyone of you who understands that, and who came out in droves to follow, cheer on, show solidarity and support. I’m not one to dwell on things, so that’s all I shall say on the matter, but THANK YOU," she continued. "From every inch of my heart. With love ‘Auntie Paula’ - as it seems I am now known!!"





View this post on Instagram









Well, it’s been the strangest 24 hours that I’ve ever experienced on social media. It started with a twitter rant using my picture as an example of what is wrong Instagram (the author has since contacted me privately and apologised) and ended with an incredible outpouring of love, support and kindness that I will be eternally grateful for. I - like many people - started this account to talk about the things in life that make me happy; Architecture, A styled room here, a cushion there, a baked cake, a summer dress or a bunch of flowers... It turned into a space where I felt comfortable to show my face and to also write a little about my feelings of positivity and being grateful, and more recently exploring my feelings of loss in losing my mother whilst still trying to seek out joy... It’s always been a safe little corner to explore a creative side that I kept hidden for so long after servicing the creative endeavours of others. I enjoy creating little scenes and stories... I’m inspired by old Hollywood, and by the fashion photography of the 1950’s and 60’s, and all that is reflected in my images. I suppose what I didn’t realise - in my naivety - is that some people look at the pictures without reading all of the captions and therefore understanding who I am... These images are meant to be joyful and fun, and are styled and created to please the eye. They are a tiny snapshot of an otherwise very mundane and normal life. Too shallow for you? Perhaps....but I’m a firm believer in taking the responsibility to find the content that brings YOU joy and moving on from the things that upset you. I just want to thank each and everyone of you who understands that, and who came out in droves to follow, cheer on, show solidarity and support. I’m not one to dwell on things, so that’s all I shall say on the matter, but THANK YOU. From every inch of my heart. With love ‘Auntie Paula’ - as it seems I am now known!! xx❤️💫 • • • #forevergrateful #joyseeker

A post shared by Paula | Hill House Vintage (@hillhousevintage) on


In an interview with The New York Times, which followed her newfound popularity, Sutton talked about race and being accepted in the English countryside.

“When I started in this community, it genuinely did not occur to me that it was not a place for me," the stylist said. "My mother was into country houses and country living. I didn’t think it was out of the norm."

Sutton said her parents came "to England from Grenada without a penny to their names but were able to eventually build a lovely life for themselves."

"They instilled in us that we could achieve anything," she said. "So I didn’t think that a lovely lifestyle and a nice house couldn’t be mine. But at the same time, making it sound easy would be unfair. I know life isn’t as simple as wishing."

The stylist added that Siddall's controversial remarks "opened [her] eyes a lot."

"But I also believe that people should live their dreams and be unafraid of what other people think,” she said. 

You can learn more about Sutton's life on her blog, The Hill House Diaries